love. support. connect.

Our kids are counting on us.

Building resilience begins with healthy relationships. Children need a trusted adult to provide a loving and supportive environment so they can grow and thrive.

Research shows that parent/caregiver-child activities can help children build resilience.

Listen and talk

Play together

Be together

Device-free

Parenting to build resilience

Parenting can be done in a way that builds resilience for children. Thankfully, there are lots of great resources to support parents. 

TED Talk

This amazing TED Talk by seven-year-old Molly Wright covers how the simple things parents and caregivers can do to support healthy development, confidence and attachment for kids.

5 Steps for Brain-Building

Did you know that you can help build a child’s brain—starting even before babies can talk? Simple serve and return interactions between adults and young children help make strong connections in developing brains. And, it’s easy and fun to do!

PACEs Connection

The PACEs Connection website has a wealth of information about ACEs and Resilience, including a number of handouts specific to parents and caregivers that can be downloaded, printed and shared for free.

Building authentic connection

This infographic from the Maine Resilience Building Network explains simple ways to build authentic connection.

Additional resources

G.E.A.R. Parent Network regularly offers workshops and support groups for parents and caregivers of children with emotional or behavioral health concerns.

Maine Families supports new parents up until children are 3 years of age.

ZERO to THREE supports the caring adults who touch the lives of infants and toddlers, hoping to maximize impact in ensuring all infants and toddlers have a bright future.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University focuses on the science of early childhood a as source of new ideas that could be used to develop more effective policies & services focused on the early years of life.

Community support

Schools and healthcare providers are working on getting better at recognizing and talking about these important issues. Don’t be surprised if you are asked to take an ACEs quiz before a doctor’s appointment, if your doctor wants to talk about childhood trauma with you, or if a teacher focuses on resilience as a path to success in school.

What are ACEs?

The hurtful things that happen to us when we’re young can have lasting impacts on our health and wellbeing. The more hurts we experience, the greater the impact may be.

Building resilience

Resilience is a skill that we can learn to develop. From practicing self-care to spending time in nature, there are lots of way to build resilience.

Social connections matter

Healthy relationships with people with similar interests or experiences to you is a huge benefit to your health.

Healthy Oxford Hills     •     181 Main Street, Norway, ME 04268     •     (207) 744-6191